2014/75 – really cute top idea – great for tops that are too short!

So this one is a bit of a weird one.

I found a picture tutorial for it on pinterest and it links to a blog but the post is gone. So you won’t be able to see the full explanation, but I still recommend you go explore the awesome blog it came from!

Pin Them All has created a quick tutorial for turning granny squares into a really cute top decoration. I guess you could use any granny square pattern you like as long as you fit the dimensions of the shirt you’re adding them to.

And with winter on its’ way, what better way to convert summer tops into winter ones?

The key (middle right) translates the stitches into US patterns so click here for our translation.

Check out the blog it came from here:

http://pinthemall.net/pin/52849e050991b/

2014/41 Girlifying a men’s shirt with crochet

Hey there!

So this one is less a crochet project and more a clothing alteration project, with little bits of crochet as the centre-piece.

I think it’s really cool how Designs by Studio C did this, and it inspired me with ideas for other outfits you could to this with – like right above the hem of a really plain skirt, or sleeves. It’s a really simple way of making boring clothes more interesting, and great for beginner crochet-ers too.

The prep for this is shown first, and the way that she recommends doing the crochet is at the bottom of the page.

For the full tutorial, see here:

http://designsbystudioc.com/how-to-alter-a-mans-t-shirt-again/

Happy crafting!

– Leeloo the Tall

Pattern translation – Upcycle a tote bag

This is a very simple way to jazz up a bag you already own, or even, as the designer of the pattern has done, some very plain and cheap bags.

Where the pattern asks for an SC, crochet a UK DC. Where it asks for a DC, crochet a UK TR.

It’ll take you no time at all and is easy peasy!

Visit Annoo’s Crochet World for the pattern!

Crochet with denim

Following on from our post about crocheting with carrier bags, other items we’ve used in the past have been cut-up sheets (cut them into strips, tie them together – they make really good rugs), cassette and video tape (haven’t made anything useful yet though!), t-shirt yarn (you know how I love it) and, my personal favourite, denim.

I’ve been making denin rugs for years. Here are some I’ve kept for my home.

IMG_20130506_170533

I crocheted this one doubled up with purple sparkly yarn. It was quite small and I couldn’t find anywhere to put it so I’ve unravelled it! It’s now waiting for me to finish this post so I can turn it into a much, much bigger rug with a beautiful new pattern based on spokes.

This is the oldest blue denim rug I have. It's hexagonal and in a high traffic area. The cats love it and it bears up to the constant pounding of feet better than any other rug I've ever had.

This is the oldest blue denim rug I have – at least 2 years old. It’s hexagonal and in a high traffic area. The cats love it and it bears up to the constant pounding of feet better than any other rug I’ve ever had.

 

This is the first denim rug I made. White in the centre set off my black surrounding it. I adore both sides of this rug - flat on one and touselled on the other. It's definitely Mine and is on the floor in front of My Chair.

This is the first denim rug I made. White in the centre set off my black surrounding it. I adore both sides of this rug – flat on one and touselled on the other. It’s definitely Mine and is on the floor in front of My Chair. Feels really good beneath bare feet.

The trick with denim is not to cut your strips too thick or they’ll be impossible to work with. Cut them no wider than an inch at most. If you can, use a metal hook larger than 5 mm. If you’re using a plastic hook, go bigger: I usually use plastic hooks of at least 8 mm. I snap them quite often all the same so metal is preferable – it’ll bend rather than break.

I started off by stealing everyone’s outgrown jeans that were a bit too battered to pass on. I cut horizontally beneath the crotch (sewists can turn that bit into a bag) and then chopped off the bottom inch of each leg. Then, I cut strips lengthwise from top to bottom. It’s much easier to work with long strips, plus you’ll end up with less knots. Tie the strips together end to end with a firm knot, and then roll up all your denim into a ball.

I still use this method but you can also buy large sheets of denim from sewing supplies shops pretty cheaply. It’s easier to cut into strips. Really, really long strips.

Denim doesn’t magically and infuriatingly knot itself like yarn. It’s also seriously sturdy so you can make not only rugs, but also bags and baskets.

All you need to do now is decide on a project and a pattern, and prepare your arms for a work out!

Tutorial: how to make and crochet with “Plarn” – plastic yarn

You’ve probably never heard of this but it’s becoming more and more popular!

Plarn!

It’s plastic yarn, made from carrier bags. Yep, the type you bring your shopping home in! If you have a wander around the Interwebs and Pinterest in particular, you’ll find people crocheting all sorts with it.

Today, we’re going to show you how to make and use your own. The process we’re going to follow can also make you t-shirt yarn (one of us would crochet with nothing else, if she could!).

First, find yourself a carrier bag (or a bin liner). Straighten it out really well.

First, find yourself a carrier bag (or a bin liner). Straighten it out really well.

Next, cut off the handles and the bottom like this.

Next, cut off the handles and the bottom like this.

Now make cuts about an inch wide from one end of the bag to the other - but not all the way across. Stop cutting about an inch from the other side, as in the picture.

Now make cuts about an inch wide from one end of the bag to the other – but not all the way across. Stop cutting about an inch from the other side, as in the picture.

At this point, I like to put my hand through the bag to make the next stage easier.

At this point, I like to put my hand through all the loops we’ve made to make the next stage easier.

Finally, you're going to cut along the lines marked in the picture. Cutting diagonally like this results in one big strand of plarn, which means no knotting up loads of little strands!

Finally, you’re going to cut along the lines marked in the picture. Cutting diagonally like this results in one big strand of plarn, which means no knotting up loads of little strands!

Ta-da!

Ta-da!

All you need to do now is roll it up ... and decide what to make with it!

All you need to do now is roll it up … and decide what to make with it!

Shove 'em in the top and pull 'em out the bottom!

We’ve seen lots of simple ideas for plarn, including washing up pads. We turned ours into a dispenser for yet more carrier bags! Shove ’em in the top and pull ’em out the bottom! We used an 8mm hook and crocheted nothing but dc.

Lampshade pattern

This gorgeous beast is an idea from a sillymoo. That’s what she calls herself. I’m not being mean :P. This is so cheery and happy, but I’m tempted to make goth themed one in black. You could make them pretty much any size you want and in any theme.

LOVE!

Visit sillymoo for the tutorial!